Monday, 19 August 2013

My Top Twelve 80s TV Theme Tunes (Live Action) Part Duex

6. Hill Street Blues (1981)
Composed by Mike Post
An iconic cop show needs an iconic theme tune and Mike Post delivers with this, frankly, lovely track. I'm not overly familiar with the show, although I did see some when I was a kid, but I absolutely adore the theme. One of those ones I recognise right away.


                                                                                                                                 

5. Miami Vice (1984)
Composed by Jan Hammer
What can you say about Miami Vice? Umm.....it's about two cops, one has an alligator called Elvis and never wears socks and the other dude was there too. True, the show was pretty groundbreaking for its time, dealing with difficult subjects more harshly than had been seen before. It made a star out of Don Johnson and the other dude was there....blah blah. The real star, though, was composer Jan Hammer who got number one singles and albums with his score for the first few seasons.



4. The A-Team (1983)
Composed by Mike Post and Pete Carpenter
One of the most loved yet ridiculed shows of the 1980s also has one of the most loved yet overused themes of the decade. I still love both show and theme, though, both made the 80s bearable. The show is still daft fun today and while it is action packed it is very tame in regards to actual violence. Guns are fired, things go 'boom' but nobody actually dies (save a couple of people who were killed off for story purposes). And Mr T is a legend.


3. Magnum P.I. (1980)
Composed by Mike Post
Another popular and well-known theme but interestingly, it wasn't the first theme tune of the show. For the first half of season one, a different, less memorable theme was composed by Ian Feebairn-Smith. From episode 12 onwards, we got the more catchy, less 70s influenced Mike Post composition. The show itself lasted for 8 seasons (keeping the exact same four man cast throughout) and is regarded as a rare show that never 'jumped the shark'. And it still holds up today, smart, witty and a bit goofy, a bit like its title character.


2. The Equalizer (1985)
Composed by Stewart Copeland
Graduating from the band The Police, Stewart Copeland decided to try his hand at score composing. After his first major movie gig, Rumble Fish, Copeland moved to TV where he scored most episodes of this tough, gritty revenge series. As with most TV shows of the past, a big screen remake is in the works starring Denzel Washington but if you ask me, that is the wong choice. The Equalizer works better if he doesn't look like he can kick your arse. Edward Woodward, small frumpy English dude, has that, big imposing Denzel, does not.


1. Quantum Leap (1989)
Composed by Mike Post
One of my favourite shows of all time and one that just makes this list, date-wise. I like to think watching Quantum Leap changed me, growing up. Seeing heroic Sam Beckett leap through time, helping other people, being other people, educated me me in some respects. This was a man who was good, through and through, who deplored bigotry of any kind and often experienced it when he would become a person of colour or a woman. I wanted to be Sam Beckett and I figured the best way to do that was to be tolerant to others and to never judge anyone by their sexuality, gender or colour of their skin. Oh, and Mike Post's theme tune is great, shame it got bastardized for the show's fifth and final season.


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